Blog

Built-in Bias: Understanding Diversity and Inclusion

Posted by: Anthea Marley on Sunday, October 15, 2017
Anthea Marley - Plain Speaking

Is it racist to acknowledge that someone has a different skin color? Anthea Marley speaks the plain truth about diversity & inclusion in the workplace

Inclusion is Good Business

Posted by: Anne Kennedy & Gillian Muessig on Thursday, February 2, 2017
inclusion, diversity

We interviewed Portland investor and TiE Global member Nitin Ray recently and he‘s ‘Bullish on inclusion’ in his own words. Well, everywhere I look now I see folks talking about inclusion, from big firms like Deloittte to venture firms like Kapor Capital to start ups like Asana.

 

Nitin Rai told us our country is becoming a ‘United Colors of Benetton’ Nation, and I’ve got to say I’m a believer. So let’s break it down. There’s a growing trend among savvy companies from ‘diversity’ toward ‘inclusion’. Here’s why: ‘Diversity’ focuses on differences, while ‘inclusion’ asks ‘how do we bring different people together? ‘Diversity’ had become code talk for hiring underrepresented minorities and women – certainly worthy goals. 

Bullish on Inclusion Talking With Investor Nitin Rai

Posted by: Anne Kennedy & Gillian Muessig on Wednesday, January 4, 2017
Nitin Rai entrepreneur investor

Entrepreneur and investor Nitin Rai is on a bold mission to change the balance of women and minorities in business for better, and he backs his intentions with solid investments. Inclusion, he says, includes everybody. Diversity frequently describes women and minorities, while inclusion welcomes, as well, veterans, rural communities, and anyone or any group underrepresented, underserved or marginalized by changing economies.

He is bullish on an inclusive future, pointing to demographic trends in the country. We are growing more multicolored, “a United Colors of Bennetton”, he says. “Teenagers today have a very different view of the world, even from millennials. Inclusion and diversity are a part of their lives, especially in cities. They not only expect this to happen, they want it to happen. We must be conscious of this upcoming generation.”